Friday, 4 March 2011

Pope Benedict has ordered bishops to support parents' role as "first educators of their children"

Yesterday Pope Benedict addressed a group of Filipino bishops in Rome. The Vatican Information Service (VIS) reported [my emphases in bold]:
"'The deep personal piety of your people needs to be nourished and supported by a profound understanding of and appreciation for the teachings of the Church in matters of faith and morals. Indeed, these elements are required in order for the human heart to give its full and proper response to God', he said.

The Holy Father likewise called on the bishops not to fail to include 'outreach to families' in their catechesis, 'with particular care for parents in their role as the first educators of their children in the faith.'"
As I noted in my blog of 7 February, the Vaughan Parents' Action Group (VPAG) has exposed the failure of Vincent Nichols, archbishop of Westminster, to provide this papally-ordered care:
"The VPAG notes that, in his 85 word statement, the Archbishop does not even mention the word “parents” ... The Church teaches that parents are “the primary and principal educators” (Gravissimum Educationis, 3) of their children, not the Diocese, and not the Bishop. It is their role to support parents in that task..."
SPUC is not going to leave parents without the support they need in their primary and principal role of protecting children against anti-life/anti-family school-based sex education (which is backed by Archbishop Nichols and the Catholic Educations Service (CES)). We have just published a new campaign bulletin on sex and relationships education (SRE) to inform, support and engage parents in the fight against the culture of death which threatens all children, born and unborn. Do read it today, order copies and spread the word.

Comments on this blog? Email them to
Sign up for alerts to new blog-posts and/or for SPUC's other email services
Follow SPUC on Twitter
Join SPUC's Facebook group
Please support SPUC. Please donate, join, and/or leave a legacy